york times – The Backwaters Press http://thebackwaterspress.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 06:40:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thebackwaterspress.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34.png york times – The Backwaters Press http://thebackwaterspress.org/ 32 32 Sarah Palin’s battle against freedom of the press faces a difficult road to the Supreme Court https://thebackwaterspress.org/sarah-palins-battle-against-freedom-of-the-press-faces-a-difficult-road-to-the-supreme-court/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 16:16:37 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/sarah-palins-battle-against-freedom-of-the-press-faces-a-difficult-road-to-the-supreme-court/ Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin (right) never had a particularly strong libel case against The New York Times. Lawyers for both sides spent about a week last month examining what was wrong with a 2017 opinion piece in the newspaper wrongly linking Palin to an earlier mass shooting. For the Times, it was an honest […]]]>

Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin (right) never had a particularly strong libel case against The New York Times. Lawyers for both sides spent about a week last month examining what was wrong with a 2017 opinion piece in the newspaper wrongly linking Palin to an earlier mass shooting. For the Times, it was an honest mistake made under the pressure of deadlines. For Palin, it was because the newspaper’s editors were secretly prejudiced against her.

A jury ruled unanimously for the Times. But the verdict was overshadowed by U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff’s decision to dismiss the case if the jury did not rule in favor of the newspaper – an odd announcement made while the jury was still deliberating. This week, Palin formally requested a new trial.

Some of the jurors told the court that they actually found out what was going on in the case because of the news alerts they saw on their phones. They assured a bailiff that the notifications did not affect their decision.

Still, the judge criticized his timing. Gautam Hans, a law professor at Vanderbilt University, told HuffPost he thinks it “creates wrinkles that didn’t need to be created.” Rakoff defended himself in a 68-page article opinion filed on Tuesday, writing that Palin’s team “completely failed to prove its case, even to the minimum standard required by law.” His job was to call his side. It would have been “grossly unfair to both sides” to wait for the jury to deliver its verdict, he wrote, because in the meantime, Palin and the Times would think the case was going to be decided by the jury. .

“While this approach is a bit unusual, neither side objected in the slightest,” Rakoff said of the timing of his decision. The jury was still allowed to deliberate assuming Palin would appeal, and it would help the appeals court to know what a jury had decided. Proceedings regarding Palin’s motion for a new trial ― and a new judge, among other demands ― are expected to unfold throughout March.

Legal experts, however, say the 2008 Republican vice-presidential nominee still faces an uphill battle in her quest to obtain damages from the New York Times. She is unlikely to get a new trial, and an appeals court seems unlikely to go along with her if she seeks that route.

Clay Calvert, a University of Florida law professor and director of the Marion Brechner First Amendment Project, said an appeals court would rely heavily on Rakoff’s long opinion to determine whether his judgment was wrong.

“I don’t think the odds are very good that the Second Circuit will reverse the decision,” Calvert said of the federal appeals court handling New York’s cases.

But whether Palin wins her case in the lower courts may not matter so much. Several people who spoke with HuffPost said they thought Palin’s case was always more important than an op-ed.

“For me, it was as much about a media narrative and the media narrative as it was about the law,” Hans said. “I think the idea that she was going to prevail at trial was unlikely, and yet the case hasn’t been settled. Why? Because I think they wanted to take the case to court, not necessarily to win in the trial court, but perhaps for other legal or political purposes.

Sarah Palin listens to New York Times attorney David Axelrod make his closing arguments during Palin's libel trial against The New York Times, at <a class=the United States Courthouse in Manhattan on February 11.” width=”720″ height=”540″ src=”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/621f91fc1e00005e001af4a9.jpeg?ops=scalefit_720_noupscale”/>
Sarah Palin listens to New York Times attorney David Axelrod make his closing arguments during Palin’s libel trial against The New York Times, at the United States Courthouse in Manhattan on February 11.

JANE ROSENBERG via Reuters

Testifying on the witness stand, Palin largely failed to form a convincing picture of how the Times editorial had harmed her personally or professionally. She found it mortifying to be falsely linked to the 2011 Arizona mass shooting that killed six people and injured more than a dozen. But after the op-ed was published, she still managed to land television appearances on high-profile shows and gave public speeches to help galvanize Republican voters.

While her trial is ongoing, however, Palin has the ability to publicly accuse The New York Times of being a hotbed of anti-conservative bias and smearing the establishment media as a whole.

Conservatives have long argued that it is too difficult to successfully prosecute the press in America. The “actual malice” standard that the Supreme Court adopted in Times v. Sullivan in 1964 ― a historic First Amendment ruling ― means that a public figure must prove that someone either posted something they knew to be untrue or recklessly ignored the truth. It’s a high bar. Later cases expanded the definition of a public figure.

Some wonder if Palin’s case is really just a way for the Supreme Court to revisit the standard of actual malice. Two judges ― Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch ― have already signaled that they are open to it. But four judges must agree to take charge of a case.

Calvert said he doubts the Supreme Court as a whole has the appetite for it, though he speculated that might have been the ultimate goal of the Palin case. Hans also suggested that other ongoing cases might provide more effective vehicles for revisiting the actual malice.

John Watson, who teaches communications law and journalism ethics at American University, offered a different view, saying he would “bet my lunch money” that at least four judges would agree to take Palin’s appeal, if it went that far, given the strength of the court. conservative bias. He pointed out that this possibility was enough to cause concern.

“The stakes are quite serious, especially for professional journalists,” Watson said.

There is also the issue of cost. It is expensive to take a case to court, let alone to the Supreme Court. Political media writer Jack Shafer raised the idea that someone ― a wealthy conservative, perhaps ― was funding Palin’s trial as a potential way to roll back press freedom in America.

Slate noted that a “particularly intriguing” figure had sat in Rakoff’s courtroom throughout Palin’s trial: Charles Harder, the lawyer who calls himself the “Gawker Slayer” for leading wrestler Hulk Hogan to victory in a lawsuit against the influential blog, which published Hogan’s sex tape.

Gawker was forced to close following a 2016 jury verdict in favor of Hogan, who was secretly receiving funding from billionaire Peter Thiel because the tech investor supposedly held a grudge against the blog. (Politico asked Thiel for comment but received no response, Shafer reported.) Palin is already represented by two lawyers who were part of the anti-Gawker legal team of Harder, Florida-based Kenneth Turkel and Shane Vogt. It is not known if anyone is helping him with the legal fees.

Former New York Times editorial page editor James Bennet holds a copy of the paper as Sarah Palin looks on during her February 9 libel trial.

JANE ROSENBERG via Reuters

Dropping the actual malice standard would be very bad news for the media, especially for small organizations and local outlets that are already cash-strapped and steadily downsizing amid media industry upheaval. .

“If this fundamental concept of actual evil is set aside, coverage of people with power and influence should almost certainly decline,” Watson said.

“A sincere effort to get the best evidence for the truth might not be enough,” he continued. “And realistically, that could make serious coverage of important issues too expensive or too risky in terms of damages from a possible defamation lawsuit.”

Of course, it’s not just the media that the true malice standard protects. Members of the public who speak are also protected.

“There are all sorts of unintended consequences that would come from changing the status quo,” Hans said.

But there’s reason to believe that Palin’s case isn’t ideal for such a challenge to First Amendment freedom of the press. His case isn’t particularly compelling — Judge Rakoff dismissed it in 2017 on a procedural issue. It was reinstated on appeal and made its way to trial, where Rakoff and a jury came to the conclusion that Palin didn’t have enough on her side.

Hans speculated that other legal vehicles might be better placed to challenge the actual malice standard, such as the dispute that arose after the Southern Poverty Law Center dubbed an evangelical church, Coral Ridge Ministries, a hate group.

A New York state law could also throw a wrench in Palin’s case. New York passed the actual malice standard alone in 2020, and according to at Reuters, Rakoff decided that the law would apply in Palin’s case. State law could also act as a safeguard for defamation suits more broadly.

“Even if the court removed actual malice toward public figures, states could still adopt their own standards,” Calvert said. “What the Supreme Court does…is just set the minimum or the floor of the First Amendment.”

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Presentation of the sustainable city podcast https://thebackwaterspress.org/presentation-of-the-sustainable-city-podcast/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 12:06:38 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/presentation-of-the-sustainable-city-podcast/ Join Andy Bush and William Shutkin as they discuss bold ideas and innovations for green, equitable and climate-friendly cities with the people who are making them happen. By: William Shutkin & Andy Bush The world is urbanizing at an unprecedented rate. Between 60 and 70 million people will move into cities every year over the […]]]>

Join Andy Bush and William Shutkin as they discuss bold ideas and innovations for green, equitable and climate-friendly cities with the people who are making them happen.

By: William Shutkin & Andy Bush

The world is urbanizing at an unprecedented rate. Between 60 and 70 million people will move into cities every year over the next few decades as the world’s population approaches 10 billion. Experts estimate that we will need to invest $90 trillion in global infrastructure over the next 15 years to keep pace. The numbers alone are staggering.

Meanwhile, in the United States, we plan to add another 100 million people by 2050. And like the rest of the planet, our cities are where the action is, driven by demand for neighborhoods transit-oriented mixed-use properties and growing engagement. climate protection and community resilience.

We have worked in the human habitat, at the intersection of urban development and sustainability, for three decades and believe that it is here, where these two forces meet, that nothing less than the fate of people and the planet is at stake. To flourish or to fail? Create or reduce? The choice is ours. It is now.

We started this podcast to have conversations with other people who feel like us, who have seen the stats and read the reports and who have decided to do something, to jump into the arena, to pursue a vision of a better and greener urban future, a more sustainable and just human habitat.

We invite you to join us to discuss bold ideas and innovations for green, equitable and climate-friendly cities with the people making them happen, here and abroad. The Sustainable City podcast will address crucial questions such as: How to build a zero carbon city? In a car-obsessed culture and with electric vehicles on the rise, are car-free communities even possible in the United States? And, do green cities inevitably mean gentrified cities, only for the wealthy?

We’ll release a new episode on the first Monday of every month, so be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Amazon, Spotify, or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Do you have any questions or comments ? You can reach us at sustainablecityshow@gmail.com.


Ep. 1: Where the suburbs end

We look at California’s bold statewide efforts to deconstruct single-family zoning to enable more diverse housing options, promote affordability, and reduce long-haul greenhouse gas emissions. . Vanguard or calamity? Our guest is Conor Dougherty, New York Times business reporter and author of “Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America.”

Listen and read at the same time


Ep. 2: Zero carbon: from buildings to cities | Released March 7, 2022

We discuss ways cities, developers, and landowners can replace fossil fuels with renewable, carbon-free energy sources to power their buildings and communities. Our guest is Josh Radoff, former senior vice president of built environment sustainability at WSP and head of the renewable and sustainable energy faculty of the Masters in Environment program at the University of Colorado at Boulder.


Ep. 3: Create car-free communities | Released April 4, 2022

Cities around the world are trying to find ways to reclaim their streets for people to walk, cycle and scooter from one point to another. The goal is to make cities safer, cleaner and more fun while reducing or completely eliminating the number of cars and trucks that have dominated urban landscapes for nearly a century. We talk with the Lord Mayor of Heidelberg, Germany, Dr. Eckart Wurzner, about his city’s efforts to create a car-free community, and with Chris Shears, an urban planner and planner who has long advocated transportation-oriented infill development in common to move Americans beyond self-reliance.


Ep. 4: Reinvent the Strip | Released May 2, 2022

Renowned planner and city planner Peter Calthorpe joins us to discuss his big idea for making California and the rest of the nation more sustainable. He calls it “Reinventing the Tape”. Calthorpe is a founding member of the Congress for the New Urbanism and author of several books, including “Sustainable Communities”, “The Next American Metropolis”, “The Regional City: Planning for the End of Sprawl” and “Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change .


Ep. 5: Sustainability and well-being in the built environment | Released June 6, 2022

We look at sustainability, health and well-being in buildings and real estate. Beyond a zero-carbon built environment, what other goals should we aim for to create better, greener and more inclusive cities? And how do we get there? Our guests are Brad Jacobson, principal at EHDD, a San Francisco-based architecture firm leading the way towards a carbon-neutral built environment, and Alaina Ladner, who leads the sustainability practice at JLL’s Project & Development Services in the West.


Ep. 6: Meeting our climate goals: the link between land use and transport | Released July 4, 2022

Rushad Nanavatty, Managing Director and Urban Transformation Program Manager at the Rocky Mountain Institute, and Ben Holland, Senior Associate and Policy Liaison at RMI, join us to explore the connection between transportation and land use. , and how each affects our ability to meet our climate goals, from commuting to street design to electric vehicles.


Ep. 7: The Role of the Sustainability/Climate/Resilience Manager in US Cities | Released August 1, 2022

Until a little over a decade ago, there was no sustainability manager or resilience manager for cities. Now cities feel incomplete without them. What are these jobs and why are they so essential to achieving urban sustainability goals? We pose these questions to our guests, Melanie Nutter, former director of the San Francisco Department of the Environment, and Susie Strife, director of the Office of Sustainability, Climate Action and Resilience for Boulder County, Colorado .


Ep. 8: Factory built environment | Released September 5, 2022

Why are we still adopting 19th century building methods in the era of 3D printed homes? And why has the United States been so slow to adopt quality modular construction compared to Northern Europe and Japan? Especially given the current housing affordability crisis and unstable supply chains, has a more streamlined, green and cost-effective approach to construction, factory-built rather than hand-built, hasn’t no Sens ? Roger Krulak and Matt Flocks, founders of Brooklyn-based Full Stack Modular, join us to help answer these questions.


About the hosts:

William Shutkin has been at the forefront of the field of sustainability for nearly three decades. David Brower, the father of the modern environmental movement, described him as “an environmental visionary creating solutions to today’s problems with a passion that would make John Muir and Martin Luther King equally proud.” He is director of Shutkin Sustainable Living in Boulder, CO, a sustainable real estate developer focused on green, mixed-use, and mixed-income infill projects in cities. Shutkin is also on the faculty of the Masters in Environment program at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he directs the Urban Resilience and Sustainability specialization. He is a co-founder of the Boston-based environmental justice law center, Alternatives for Community & Environment, and in 1999 founded New Ecology, Inc., with a mission of green community development in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. Shutkin is the former president and CEO of the Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco and served on the faculty of MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning from 1999 to 2009. He is the author of the award-winning book “The Land That Could Be: Environmentalism and Democracy in the Twenty-First Century” and “A Republic of Trees: Field Notes on People, Place and Planet”.

Andre Bush is the founder and managing partner of Morgan Creek Ventures, a real estate development and advisory group based in Boulder, Colorado. Over the past two decades, Morgan Creek Ventures has developed a variety of sustainable real estate projects with a focus on creative office and infill residential opportunities. MCV projects have received LEED Silver, Gold and Platinum certifications and have included advanced technologies in building management systems, green roofs, solar installations and water treatment. Bush’s current goal is to develop reproducible models for commercial developers in the area of ​​”Net Zero” construction. He was educated at the University of Wisconsin in urban planning and has served as a director and board member of several other real estate holding companies, redevelopment associations and family foundations. He is a regular speaker on the topic of urban development and sustainability.

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8 Things People With Healthy Savings Accounts Always Do https://thebackwaterspress.org/8-things-people-with-healthy-savings-accounts-always-do/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 12:01:09 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/8-things-people-with-healthy-savings-accounts-always-do/ Saving Money / Savings Tips PeopleImages/iStock.com If your savings account seems thin or non-existent, you’re definitely not alone. It has been reported that around 50% of people have less than three months of emergency savings, and a recent GOBankingRates survey found that a staggering 40% of women have less than $100 in their savings accounts. […]]]>

PeopleImages/iStock.com

If your savings account seems thin or non-existent, you’re definitely not alone. It has been reported that around 50% of people have less than three months of emergency savings, and a recent GOBankingRates survey found that a staggering 40% of women have less than $100 in their savings accounts. saving.

See: 16 effective tips and tricks to help you save money in 2022
Find: where and when to shop to save money on clothes

Although the ability to save money sometimes depends on factors beyond your control, we spoke to several experts who offered a manual on how people with healthy savings accounts do it.

Set a monthly budget and stick to it

While budgeting might seem like the obvious answer, that’s because it works, according to David Frederick, director of customer success and consulting at First bank. According to Frederick, an effective budget is your best tracking tool for how much an individual or household is bringing in, how much they’re spending, and how much they can save.

“Expenses are the variable that people can most easily control,” he said.

Check Out: 7 Fastest Ways to Save $20,000, According to Experts

Use advanced savings tools

If the only tool you use to save is a savings account, you risk missing out on earning potential, Frederick warned.

“While it is okay to put money in a savings account, there are often better accounts for long-term savings purposes. People concerned about retirement should save in a 401(k) or IRA. People concerned about health care costs should consider saving in a Health Savings Account (HSA). People saving for a child’s education should consider opening a 529 savings account.”

GOBankingRates’ Top Picks: Best Savings Accounts of 2022

Avoid and mitigate debt

One of the most effective ways to increase savings is to reduce debt, Frederick suggested. Although some debts are difficult to avoid, from mortgages to student loans, he urged people to pay off those debts as quickly and deliberately as possible.

“Also, harmful debts like credit card balances and payday loans should be avoided whenever possible,” Frederick said.

To learn: 19 effective ways to manage your budget

Reduce lifestyle inflation

As we make more money, we tend to spend more money, a concept called “lifestyle inflation,” said Jeff Mains, CEO of Champion Leadership Group LLC, which helps entrepreneurs scale their business. It eats away at all the money we could spend on savings.

So, you should make it your goal to live below your means, says Amanda Howerton, Certified Financial Planner at RKCapital.com.

“People with the healthiest savings accounts are most often the ones who are truly living below their means,” she said. She acknowledged: “It’s so much easier said than done in the age of social media and targeted marketing, so the ‘wish list’ items you casually browse online appear daily. in advertisements.” However, it will be the difference between several thousand dollars over time.

Explore: 10 small changes to stay on track with your savings goals

Automate deposits

According to Brad Biren, Esq, LL.M., a tax law expert known as “RefundDrTax.”

“Calculate what would be a reasonable amount to allocate to savings and automatically transfer that amount into savings. This avoids forgetting and deciding not to.

Set savings deadlines

Additionally, Biren said, “There’s a certain magic that happens when you challenge a person to achieve a goal.” In other words, savings goals are more likely to get you to your amount faster.

“Assuming the goal is achievable, but a little stretched, it will probably become a new habit, as long as the discomfort of the race to save is not too high. For example, stretching or tightening the belt, savers realized they could live happily with less, don’t stop them, keep it up.

He recommends incremental savings goals rather than larger goals for more consistent success and a chance to celebrate accomplishments.

Discover: 50 ways to live the high life on a small budget

Organize short and long term financial goals

It can be more effective to have multiple levels of goals, said Amanda Sullivan, research analyst at CreditDonkey. “People who have a healthy savings account have it for a purpose. Whether it is a mortgage, a car loan or a retirement fund, the money in their banks is used for short or long term financial purposes.

Most likely, they will do this using the bucket savings strategy, where a certain amount of money is set aside in pursuit of a certain goal.

Goals provide a concrete reason to save, said consumer credit expert Tanya Peterson, vice president of branding at Liberty Financial Network, a digital personal finance company. “When you work on things that are important to you, whether it’s saving money, exercising, breaking a bad habit or whatever, you dramatically increase the chances of that happening.”

Options: 16 Effective Ways to Cheat Yourself to Save Money

Look for small ways to save

Smart savers typically look for small ways to save, Petersen laments. “These little ways to work on building a smart spending habit and keeping that focus on your goals. It could be making coffee at home instead of buying expensive lattes or hanging clothes to dry instead of using the dryer. The little things will add up and apply to larger expenses as well.

More from GOBankingRates

About the Author

Jordan Rosenfeld is a freelance writer and author of nine books. She holds a BA from Sonoma State University and an MFA from Bennington College. His articles and essays on finance and other topics have appeared in a wide range of publications and clients including The Atlantic, The Billfold, Good Magazine, GoBanking Rates, Daily Worth, Quartz, Medical Economics, The New York Times , Ozy, Paypal, The Washington Post and for many commercial customers. As someone who had to learn a lot of her money lessons the hard way, she enjoys writing about personal finance to empower and educate people on how to make the most of what they have and how to live. a better quality of life.

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3 Questions: Women’s Rights and Growing Threats to Press Freedom Around the World | MIT News https://thebackwaterspress.org/3-questions-womens-rights-and-growing-threats-to-press-freedom-around-the-world-mit-news/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 19:55:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/3-questions-womens-rights-and-growing-threats-to-press-freedom-around-the-world-mit-news/ For Ada Petriczko, being born a woman can be a matter of life and death. Originally from Poland, she reports on sexual violence and gender injustice around the world. As a human rights journalist, her mission is to amplify the voices of women who have been systematically silenced by their communities and governments. Their stories […]]]>

For Ada Petriczko, being born a woman can be a matter of life and death. Originally from Poland, she reports on sexual violence and gender injustice around the world. As a human rights journalist, her mission is to amplify the voices of women who have been systematically silenced by their communities and governments. Their stories must be heard, she argues, in order to reshape our societies. This includes reporting from her home country, where democratic stability and women’s rights are increasingly under threat.

Petriczko joined the MIT Center for International Studies (CIS) last fall as its Elizabeth Neuffer Scholar. The scholarship is awarded annually by The International Women’s Media Foundation and provides its recipient with research opportunities at MIT and further training at The Boston Globe and The New York Times.

Recently, she sat down to discuss her guiding principles as a journalist, the challenges facing her profession, and the rewarding experiences of this fellowship. It also weighs on the rise of autocracy in Central and Eastern Europe. On February 3, she will explore this subject and its impact on free media during a IEC Starr Forum Event with experts from Poland, Hungary and Russia.

Q: One of your areas of interest is journalism ethics. What does it mean to you to be an ethical journalist? And what are some of the challenges facing ethical journalism today?

A: I don’t believe in objectivity, but I do believe in fairness. Ethical journalism is about being fair to the facts and to the people you write about. Aidan White, an esteemed journalist who founded the Ethical Journalism Network, told me in an interview that there are about 400 different codes of conduct for journalism around the world, but if you look at them carefully, they all boil down to the same five basic principles: accuracy, independence, impartiality, humanity and responsibility. I try to play by these rules.

I report on sexual violence and other human rights violations within vulnerable communities and have been in situations where people don’t want to share their experiences. I always respect their requests and back down, even though I’ve traveled far for the story. This can be a game changer in today’s extremely fast-paced and demanding news landscape. Ethical journalism requires more time and thought. But I found ways to talk about taboos without violating them. And it’s often even more powerful.

We are facing a moment of transition in the information ecosystem. The rise of social media and outdated media financial models have had a negative impact on ethical journalism. It takes time and money to support in-depth reporting, which is becoming increasingly limited.

The global rise of autocracy, of course, also challenges democratic institutions, including freedom of press and speech. And the Covid-19 pandemic has provided crumbling democracies with the perfect excuse to do just that.

In Poland, for example, we are facing a humanitarian crisis on the Belarusian border where thousands of migrants are seeking refuge from horrific situations. Shortly after the Covid-19 outbreak, the Polish government banned journalists from entering the border region to cover the crisis. This is unprecedented in the history of post-war Europe.

NGO [nongovernmental organizations] and multinational organizations around the world are beginning to see these issues as real threats. Maria Ressawho received the Nobel Peace Prize for Journalism and whom I recently interviewed for The Boston Globe, defends an international fund for journalists. So that gives me an element of hope.

Q: You have teamed up with journalists from other countries for certain projects, in particular Witch hunt. Tell us more about this style of work – called cross-border journalism – and why it’s important.

A: In the cross-border method, journalists work as partners on a story but stay within their respective countries, cultures and ethnicities. This type of reporting allows a reporter to bring a unique perspective and expertise to the story without having to travel hundreds or thousands of miles. The Panama Papers are probably the most famous example of this type of reporting; a global team worked together to expose the corruption of the offshore financial industry.

Cross-border journalism offers a cheaper, more culturally sensitive and environmentally conscious alternative to conventional foreign journalism. That said, the traditional model has many advantages. There are stories in which an outsider’s perspective is simply invaluable. I’ve spent most of my career on assignments in India and South America, and while I enjoy working there, I’ve come to realize over the years that this type of reporting is becoming unsustainable. The climate crisis and other threats I spoke of earlier will make the traditional style of foreign reporting increasingly difficult and rare.

In addition, the cross-border model offers the possibility of hearing journalists who are not part of the mainstream media, generally Anglo-Saxon. We all read the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Atlanticand the boston globe, which are amazing outlets with long traditions and high journalistic standards. But there’s also an inherent bias to the work there. Even though English is today’s lingua franca, a journalist who is not a native speaker has very little chance of being hired as an employee in one of these major media.

Q: What did you work on during your internship?

A: I use the fellowship to delve deeper into topics I have reported on for the past three years. For example, I am taking a course on the history of India, which has helped me better understand the impact that colonialism and partition had on women’s rights and violence in this region. It will provide invaluable context to my most important project – a non-fiction book about the 45 million women that India’s population misses due to widespread sexual selection. As part of my research in Boston, I interviewed Amartya Sen (forthcoming in The Boston Globe), Nobel laureate in economics, who was the first person to calculate that more than 100 million women are missing from the world’s population. In my book, I try to understand the implications of this phenomenon. How do communities deal with such an absence of women? Why does this scarcity breed even more violence against women? What impact does this have on the future of families in these communities?

At MIT, I also explored free speech in my part of the world – the Central European region – where we have seen a rise in autocracy.

AT The Boston Globe, I was a member of the editorial board, which was a remarkable experience. And, in addition to interviewing two Nobel laureates, I’ve written opinion pieces and editorials on abortion rights in texas and the humanitarian crisis in Poland. Now I am preparing my residency at The New York Times.

The greatest value for me is the opportunity to train under the mentorship of the best publishers and scholars in the world. It has boosted my confidence as a journalist and will hopefully make me a valuable voice in public debate in my country, which is at the crossroads between democracy and autocracy. Being in the United States, where democratic institutions are still strong, helped me remember my values.

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Press freedom fighter Jodie Ginsburg expands her fight https://thebackwaterspress.org/press-freedom-fighter-jodie-ginsburg-expands-her-fight/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 19:41:53 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/press-freedom-fighter-jodie-ginsburg-expands-her-fight/ Jodie Ginsberg was running a small free speech organization in London in 2014 when Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab walked into her office. He had recently been released from prison for organizing democratic rallies during the Arab Spring and posting tweets that the Bahrain monarchy found offensive. He made Ms Ginsberg realize how important […]]]>

Jodie Ginsberg was running a small free speech organization in London in 2014 when Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab walked into her office.

He had recently been released from prison for organizing democratic rallies during the Arab Spring and posting tweets that the Bahrain monarchy found offensive. He made Ms Ginsberg realize how important it was for her colleagues who remained in prison to know that people were fighting for them.

When Mr. Rajab was again thrown into prison soon after his return to Bahrain, Ms. Ginsberg held vigils outside the Bahraini embassy, ​​stayed in regular contact with his family to document his condition and campaigned vehemently for his release.

“One of the reasons my case became known internationally was Jodie,” Mr Rajab said of Bahrain’s modern capital, Manama, where he is serving the final year of his final sentence, for voicing anti-government dissent on Twitter, from home.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, one of the world’s largest press watchdog organizations, recently announced that Ms Ginsberg would become its new chair in April.

Ms. Ginsberg, veteran journalist and free speech advocate, takes over at a time when journalists are increasingly under threat, with a record number of incarcerations around the world and press freedom attacks on the rise in the United States.

It’s a challenge she’s passionate about, says Ginsberg. A optimistic who has helped many outspoken artists and imprisoned activists gain international attention, she believes that “journalism is essential if we are to have free, independent and tolerant societies”.

“The experience of being persecuted for your work is extremely isolating,” Ms Ginsberg said, referring to Mr Rajab’s case. “And it’s even worse if you don’t feel that people are showing solidarity.”

Growing up in a middle-class family in Potters Bar, a suburban town just north of London, Ms Ginsberg carried a pencil and paper with her as a child and regularly broadcast newscasts for her grandparents , posing as a foreign correspondent like the BBC’s Kate Adie. Hired by Reuters out of graduate school, Ms Ginsberg soon got her big break by traveling to Johannesburg as a business correspondent. Later she ran the large London bureau of Reuters, overseeing a team of 45 journalists, writing about the 2008 banking crisis and covering the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

Although her former boss, David Schlesinger, described her as passionate and fearless, Ms Ginsberg said she never personally felt threatened because of her work. It was later, after she became the head of a small non-profit free speech organization, Censorship Index, that she was passionate about protecting journalists, even in the seemingly least likely place: the United States.

“In 2018, I was on a press freedom mission in the United States and I clearly remember these two White House correspondents talking about how they received death threats on a daily basis, as if c was normal,” she said from her home in Cambridge, England. “I was horrified.”

“It made me go from being a journalist by profession to being a journalist lawyer,” she said.

Ms Ginsberg has spent the past two years heading the European branch of Internews, a large non-profit organization that trains and supports freelance journalists around the world. Three days after arriving in March 2020, the company announced a trial lockdown due to a strange new global virus. Employees have still not returned to the London office.

Understanding that freelance journalists already working on shoestring budgets would need to cover the pandemic quickly, she helped get the ball rolling. a new fund which has offered some 180 grants to journalists and news organizations around the world.

“I strongly believe that we can only make decisions about ourselves and our world if we have the information to do so,” said Ms Ginsberg, 44, a married mother of two.

The Committee to Protect Journalists was created in 1981 by two American journalists who had worked in parallel to raise awareness about the case of Alcibíades González Delvalle, a Paraguayan columnist and critic of his country’s military government who had been arrested for one of his columns.

A few weeks after their campaign, Mr. González Delvalle was released. Realizing that no other organization was monitoring press freedom from the United States, the two journalists, Michael Massing and Laurie Nadel, assembled a board of distinguished, award-winning journalists from major organizations such as The New York Times, The New Yorker, the Washington Post and CBS. Renowned CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite, recently retired, has signed on as honorary chairman of the group. Its mandate was to protect journalists outside America who did not have First Amendment shelter or ready access to human rights lawyers.

“We felt we had those protections and privileges, unlike other countries,” said Massing, who still sits on the board. “We would use our own influence and prestige in America to help journalists in other countries.”

Since then, CPJ has grown into one of the world’s leading press freedom organizations, with an annual budget of $10 million, more than 50 staff and contractors, and a global presence that stretches from the Nigerian capital, Abuja, Guatemala City and New Delhi.

In 2001, it expanded its mandate from raising awareness of journalists under threat to directly helping some of them, offering emergency funds to hire lawyers, obtain medical treatment or flee their country.

Last year, the organization helped around 60 journalists and their families evacuate Afghanistan after the Taliban took power.

CPJ is currently assisting with the case of Jeffrey Moyo, a Zimbabwean freelance journalist who works with the New York Times and faces criminal charges under the country’s immigration law for helping two Times reporters enter the Zimbabwe last year.

The organization’s successes, however, have been wiped out by increasing attacks on journalists, not just in places where authoritarian governments rule, but in the United States, where former President Donald J. Trump repeatedly decried the press, a tactic he has continued since leaving office one year ago.

When CPJ’s longtime executive director Joel Simon announced he would step down effective late last year, he said it was with waning optimism.

“The decline in press freedom has produced more cases – more journalists who need support, so you have to respond to those people,” Mr Simon said in an interview. “But if you do that exclusively, you kind of swim in place. Ultimately, you want the situation to improve. So how do you both support journalists who are currently under threat and address broader challenges to press freedom in a constructive way? »

Ms. Ginsberg agrees. “We want journalists to be safe so that people have access to a free and independent press,” she said. “And that means addressing systemic issues that threaten the safety of journalists, not just working on individual cases.”

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Biden held fewer first-year press conferences than any of his five predecessors https://thebackwaterspress.org/biden-held-fewer-first-year-press-conferences-than-any-of-his-five-predecessors/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 12:41:58 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/biden-held-fewer-first-year-press-conferences-than-any-of-his-five-predecessors/ Joe Biden held far fewer press conferences than five of his immediate predecessors in his first year in office and granted fewer media interviews than the six presidents who preceded him. In the first year, President Biden gave just nine official press conferences — six solo and three jointly with visiting foreign leaders. He also […]]]>

Joe Biden held far fewer press conferences than five of his immediate predecessors in his first year in office and granted fewer media interviews than the six presidents who preceded him.

In the first year, President Biden gave just nine official press conferences — six solo and three jointly with visiting foreign leaders. He also conducted 22 media interviews.

By comparison, at this point in their respective presidencies, Donald Trump has held 21 press conferences, Barack Obama at 27, George W. Bush at 19, Bill Clinton at 38, and George HW Bush at 31.

Ronald Reagan only held six press conferences in 1981 because his schedule was cut at the start of his first term in 1981 after an assassination attempt.

Reagan, however, participated in 59 interviews during his first year as president.

Biden’s dismal show only bolsters speculation that the president isn’t running the show in the White House, which is fueled by Biden’s continued comments in public appearances that his press team doesn’t want him he speaks to members of the media.

Biden has given just 22 media interviews, fewer than any of his six most recent White House predecessors at the same time in their presidencies.

President Joe Biden gave far fewer press conferences in his first year in office than his five predecessors

These interviews included one-on-one sessions with reporters from three major television networks, three CNN town halls, an appearance on MSNBC, a trio of regional television interviews via Zoom, as well as conversations with late-night host Jimmy Fallon and ESPN’s Sage Steele.

He granted only three print interviews.

Trump conducted 92 interviews in his first year in office, including more than two dozen with right-wing Fox News. He also held lengthy sessions with ABC News, The Associated Press, The New York Times, Reuters, and other outlets whose coverage he challenged throughout his presidency.

The White House responded to media requests — and complaints from the White House Correspondents’ Association — for Biden to do more one-on-one interviews and formal press conferences.

In what has become a familiar scene, Biden lingered after delivering a recent speech on the pandemic as reporters fired off a barrage of questions, some of which he gave answers to.

“I’m not supposed to have this press conference right now,” Biden said at the end of a winding response that didn’t directly answer a question about Sen. Joe Manchin killing the 1.75 Build Back Better package. trillion dollars.

Seconds later, Biden turned and walked out of the state dining room, abruptly ending what has become his preferred method for his limited press engagements.

The dynamic between Biden and the media has the White House wondering if Biden, who has sworn to have the most transparent administration in the nation’s history, fails to pull back the curtain on the workings of his administration and to miss opportunities to explain his program. .

Biden often takes a few questions from the press after his public remarks instead of scrambling for formal press conferences or media interviews.  Here the President leaves after speaking about the October jobs report on November 5, 2021

Biden often takes a few questions from the press after his public remarks instead of scrambling for formal press conferences or media interviews. Here the President leaves after speaking about the October jobs report on November 5, 2021

Biden asks questions more frequently in public appearances than any of his recent predecessors, according to new research published by Martha Joynt Kumar, professor emeritus of political science at Towson University and director of the White House Transition Project.

He regularly stops to talk to reporters who shout questions over Marine One’s whirring propellers as he paces back and forth from the White House. He parries with reporters at Oval Office photo ops and other events. But these exchanges have their limits.

“While President Biden has answered questions more often at his events than his predecessors, he spends less time doing so,” Kumar notes. “He provides short answers with few follow-ups when answering questions at the end of a previously scheduled speech.”

White House press secretary Jen Psaki pushed back, arguing that a formal press conference with “embroidered cushions” on reporters’ seats is unnecessary since Biden takes questions several times a week.

But those exchanges often don’t allow for follow-up questions, and Biden can ignore questions he might not want to answer.

“Ephemeral exchanges are not enough to build the historical record of the president’s views on a wide range of public concerns. We’ve had few opportunities in this first year to learn the president’s perspective on a wide range of public concerns,” said Steven Portnoy, president of the White House Correspondents’ Association and a reporter for CBS New Radio. “The more formal the exchange with the press, the more the public is likely to know more about what the man is thinking.”

PSAKI also holds daily press briefings, unlike his predecessors in the Trump administration.

The president answered questions at 55% of the events where he delivered remarks or a speech, more than even two of the most vocal presidents, Bill Clinton (48%) and Trump (41%).

White House officials pointed to these frequent interactions with reporters as proof that Biden has demonstrated his commitment to transparency. Officials also suggested the pandemic also affected the number of interviews and press conferences in the administration’s first year.

“I think we’ve been very transparent,” White House deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said. “I don’t think you can just fragment and I think you have to look at it as a whole.”

Trump had regular, and sometimes lengthy, exchanges with reporters as a Marine One waited for him on the South Lawn.

Biden carried on the tradition of “chopper talk,” a nickname coined by late-night host Stephen Colbert for tense exchanges, though he tends to keep the exchanges brief.

At other times, Biden has used the exchanges to drive the news cycle.

Asked after a private visit with Pope Francis to the Vatican in October if they had discussed abortion, Biden said it had not been brought up. But then he quickly pivoted to claim Francis had told him he was “a good Catholic and that I should continue to receive Communion.” All the round trips with the journalists lasted about a minute.

The administration has been focused on finding ways to talk to Americans where they are as it tries to maximize the president’s limited time for messaging efforts, according to a White House official who snagged. spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the administration’s communication strategy.

To that end, Biden was interviewed by YouTube personality Manny Mua and appeared on “The Tonight Show” to advance his national agenda and encourage people to get vaccinated. The White House believes such platforms can help the president more easily reach middle-class workers or young Americans who aren’t glued to cable networks or The New York Times.

Biden has also leaned on celebrities with big social media followings — including actress and songwriter Olivia Rodrigo and Bill Nye The Science Guy — who made videos with Biden to help bolster his vaccination campaign and to plug in its major national spending initiatives.

Biden is not the first president to look beyond mainstream media to try to connect with the public.

Former President Barack Obama appeared on Zach Galifianakis’ “Between Two Ferns” to help sell his health care law and visited comedian Marc Maron’s garage to record an episode on the popular WTF podcast days after the 2015 Charleston church shooting. Obama spoke bluntly about racism in the high-profile interview with Maron.

Trump has frequently called out on Fox News opinion shows, directly reaching his base without the filter of reporters.

Brian Ott, a communications professor at Missouri State University who studies presidential rhetoric, said the paucity of Biden’s press conferences and interviews with mainstream media could help explain why approval ratings of Biden are near historic lows, even though most polls show that much of his domestic agenda remains popular with a majority of Americans.

While pop culture and social media provide opportunities to connect with a segment of America, Ott said, the president connecting with the electorate through traditional broadcast and print media — and holding conferences official press releases – will be key to correcting this disconnect.

“Presidency has always been a mostly rhetorical business,” Ott said. “You can’t drive a program without a casting vision and part of that has to go through the mainstream press.”

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Reviews | Dangerous move over Times, Project Veritas, and press freedom https://thebackwaterspress.org/reviews-dangerous-move-over-times-project-veritas-and-press-freedom/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 22:24:16 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/reviews-dangerous-move-over-times-project-veritas-and-press-freedom/ [ad_1] Half a century ago, the Supreme Court settled the question of when a court can prevent the publication of a newspaper. In 1971, the Nixon administration attempted to prevent The Times and The Washington Post from publishing classified Defense Department documents detailing the history of the Vietnam War – the so-called Pentagon Papers. Faced […]]]>


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Half a century ago, the Supreme Court settled the question of when a court can prevent the publication of a newspaper. In 1971, the Nixon administration attempted to prevent The Times and The Washington Post from publishing classified Defense Department documents detailing the history of the Vietnam War – the so-called Pentagon Papers. Faced with an affirmed threat to the security of the nation, the Supreme Court sided with the newspapers. “Without an informed and free press there can be no enlightened people,” Judge Potter Stewart wrote in a concurring opinion.

This sentiment reflects one of the oldest and most enduring tenets of our legal system: the government can not tell the press what it can and cannot publish. This principle predates the Constitution, but so there would be no mistake, the founders of the nation included a guarantee in the Bill of Rights anyway. “Congress will not make any law,” says the First Amendment, “restricting freedom of speech or of the press.”

This is why virtually all official attempts to ban advance speaking or reporting, known as pre-restriction, are canceled. “Any system of prior expression restrictions is submitted to this court with a strong presumption against its constitutional validity,” said the Supreme Court in a 1963 case. Such restrictions are “the very prototype of the greatest threat to the values ​​of the First Amendment, “wrote Judge Antonin Scalia a generation later.

On Friday, however, a New York trial judge broke this precedent when he issued an order barring the Times from publishing or even reporting more information it had obtained regarding Project Veritas, the group of conservative espionage that traffics hidden and fake cameras. identities to target liberal politicians and interest groups, as well as mainstream media.

The order, a very unusual and surprisingly broad injunction against a news organization, was issued by state Supreme Court Judge Charles D. Wood, who wrote that the Times’ decision to publish excerpts from Notes written by lawyers for Project Veritas “calls for court intervention to protect the integrity of the judicial process.” The move follows a similar directive released last month by Justice Wood in response to an article published by The Times and citing the memos. The Times plans to appeal the latter decision.

In seeking Judge Wood’s order, lawyers for Project Veritas acknowledged that pre-publication restrictions are rare, but argued that their case falls within a narrow exception that the law recognizes for documents that may be used in the process. part of an ongoing litigation. This exception recognizes that because the parties are obligated by the court to disclose documents, the courts should have the power to oversee how such coerced disclosures are used by the other party. The litigation here is a defamation lawsuit that Project Veritas filed against The Times in 2020, for its articles on a video the group produced about what it claimed was widespread electoral fraud in Minnesota. The video was “likely part of a coordinated disinformation effort,” the Times reported, citing analysis by researchers at Stanford University and the University of Washington.

Class lawyers also argue that the memos are protected by solicitor-client privilege and that the Times had an ethical obligation to refer them to Project Veritas, rather than publishing them. This is not the way journalism works. The Times, like any other news organization, makes ethical judgments on a daily basis about whether to divulge secret information from governments, businesses and others in the news. But the First Amendment is about leaving those ethical decisions to journalists, not the courts. The only potential exception is information so sensitive – for example, planned troop movements during a war – that its publication could pose a serious threat to American lives or to national security.

Project Veritas legal notes are not a matter of national security. In fact, without its ongoing libel lawsuit, the group would have no claim against The Times. The memos at issue have nothing to do with this lawsuit and did not reach The Times through the discovery process. Still, Project Veritas argues that their publication should be banned because the notes contain confidential information relevant to the group’s litigation strategy.

It is an absurd and deeply threatening argument for a free press. Consider the consequences: News organizations could be routinely prevented from reporting information about a person or business simply because the subject of that report decided that the information could one day be used in litigation. More alarming is the prospect that journalists could be banned even from asking questions of sources, lest someone say something that turns out to be privileged. It is not a speculative fear; in his previous order, Justice Wood banned The Times from reporting on anything covered by Project Veritas’ attorney-client privilege. In Friday’s ruling, he ordered The Times to destroy all copies of the notes he obtained and banned him from reporting on the substance of those notes. The press is free to report on matters of public interest, he wrote, but lawyers’ notes to their clients do not erase that bar.

It’s a jaw-dropping justification: Judge Wood has taken it upon himself to decide what The Times can and cannot report. This is not how the First Amendment is supposed to work.

Journalism, like democracy, thrives in an environment of transparency and freedom. No court should be able to tell the New York Times or any other news organization – or, for that matter, Project Veritas – how to conduct its reporting. Otherwise, it would prompt the subjects of any journalist to sue for frivolous libel in order to control media coverage about them. More precisely, it would reverse the values ​​embodied by the First Amendment and hamper the functioning of the free press on which an autonomous republic depends.

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US counterterrorism unit investigated journalists, raising concerns over press freedom https://thebackwaterspress.org/us-counterterrorism-unit-investigated-journalists-raising-concerns-over-press-freedom/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 22:31:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/us-counterterrorism-unit-investigated-journalists-raising-concerns-over-press-freedom/ [ad_1] A special customs and border protection unit used sensitive government terrorist tracking databases to investigate up to 20 US-based journalists, including an award-winning Associate Press reporter Pulitzer, according to a federal watchdog.Eric Gay / The Associated Press A special customs and border protection unit used sensitive government terrorist tracking databases to investigate up to […]]]>


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A special customs and border protection unit used sensitive government terrorist tracking databases to investigate up to 20 US-based journalists, including an award-winning Associate Press reporter Pulitzer, according to a federal watchdog.Eric Gay / The Associated Press

A special customs and border protection unit used sensitive government terrorist tracking databases to investigate up to 20 US-based journalists, including an award-winning Associate Press reporter Pulitzer, according to a federal watchdog.

Yahoo News, which published a detailed report on the investigation, also found that the unit, the Counter Network Division, had questioned the files of Congressional staff members and possibly members of Congress.

Jeffrey Rambo, an agent who admitted to carrying out checks on journalists in 2017, told federal investigators the practice was routine. “When a name appears on your desktop you also run it into whatever systems you have access to, it’s just the status quo, that’s what everyone else does,” Rambo said, quoted by Yahoo News.

The PA obtained a redacted copy of a more than 500 page report from the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security which included the same statement, but with the name of the speaker blacked out. The border protection agency is part of DHS.

Number of jailed journalists peaked in 2021, at least 24 killed for coverage: CPJ report

Opinion: from Ossietzky to Ressa and Muratov, Nobel Peace Prize-winning journalists continue the fight for press freedom

The revelations alarmed news outlets and prompted a demand for a full explanation.

“We are deeply concerned about this apparent abuse of power. This appears to be an example of journalists being targeted for just doing their job, which is a violation of the First Amendment, ”Lauren Easton, AP media relations manager, said in a statement.

In its own statement, CBP did not specifically address the investigation, but said: “CBP’s verification and investigation operations, including those conducted by the Counter Network division, are strictly governed by protocols and well-established good practices. CBP does not investigate individuals without a legitimate and legal basis for doing so. “

An employee of Rambo’s Storymakers Coffee Roasters, a small storefront in San Diego’s Barrio Logan neighborhood, said on Saturday that Rambo was not immediately available for comment. Rambo lives in San Diego.

The new disclosures are just the latest examples of federal agencies using their power to scrutinize the contacts of journalists and others.

Earlier this year, Attorney General Merrick Garland formally barred prosecutors from seizing journalists’ files in leak investigations, with a few exceptions, reversing years of departmental policy. The action came after an outcry over revelations that Trump’s Justice Department obtained files belonging to journalists, as well as Democratic members of Congress and their aides and a former House lawyer. Blanche, Don McGahn.

During the Obama administration, federal investigators secretly seized the telephone tapes of some PA journalists and editors. These seizures involved office and home telephone lines as well as cell phones.

The use of databases by Rambo and the CBP Unit was more extensive than previously thought. The Inspector General returned criminal charges of abuse of government databases and lying to investigators, but the Justice Department refused to prosecute Rambo and two other DHS employees.

Rambo complained to Yahoo News that CBP did not support him and that he was unfairly portrayed in the reports.

“What none of these articles identifies to me is a law enforcement officer who was cleared of wrongdoing, who actually had a real goal of doing what I was doing,” he said. he said, “and CBP refuses to admit it, refuses to admit it, refuses to right this wrong.

Rambo had previously been identified as the agent who had accessed the travel records of journalist Ali Watkins, then working for Politico, and questioned her about confidential sources. Watkins now writes for the New York Times.

Rambo was assigned to the CBP unit, which is part of the National Targeting Center in Sterling, Va., In 2017. He told investigators he initially approached Watkins as part of a larger effort to bring the journalists to write about forced labor around the world as a national security issue.

He also described similar efforts with AP reporter Martha Mendoza, according to an unwritten summary obtained by Yahoo News. Rambo’s unit “was able to assess MENDOZA as a reputable journalist,” the summary said, before trying to establish a relationship with her because of her expertise in writing about forced labor. Mendoza won his second Pulitzer Prize in 2016 as part of a team that reported on slave labor in the fishing industry in Southeast Asia.

Dan White, Rambo’s supervisor in Washington, told investigators his unit was running Mendoza through multiple databases, and “CBP discovered that one of the phone numbers on Mendoza’s phone was linked to a terrorist. Yahoo News reported. White’s case was also referred for prosecution and was dismissed.

In response, AP Easton said, “The Associated Press demands an immediate explanation from U.S. Customs and Border Protection as to why reporters, including AP investigative reporter Martha Mendoza, were searched in databases used to track terrorists and identified as potential recruits of confidential informants.

It was Rambo’s awareness of Watkins that led to the Inspector General’s investigation. As he pointedly searched for her to continue his forced labor work, Rambo quickly focused on investigating the leaks. Rambo even gave him a name, “Operation Whistle Pig,” for the brand of whiskey he drank when he met Watkins at a Washington, DC bar in June 2017.

The only person charged and convicted as a result of Rambo’s efforts is James Wolfe, a former Senate Intelligence Committee security director who had a personal relationship with Watkins. Wolfe pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contact with reporters.

During conversations with FBI agents, Rambo was asked at length about his interest in Watkins. He used the travel documents to confront her about her relationship with Wolfe, claiming Wolfe was her source of stories. Watkins acknowledged the relationship, but insisted Wolfe did not provide information for his stories.

Rambo said Watkins was not the only journalist whose records he searched government databases, although he maintained in his interviews with the FBI that he was only interested in whether Wolfe was providing any information. classified information. Rambo said he “performed CBP file checks” on “15-20 national security reporters,” according to an FBI summary of the interrogation contained in the Inspector General’s report.

New York Times spokeswoman Danielle Rhoades-Ha said new details of the Watkins investigation raised new concerns.

“We are deeply disturbed to learn how US Customs and Border Protection conducted this investigation into a journalist’s sources. As the Attorney General has made clear, the government must stop using leak investigations as an excuse to interfere with journalism. It is time for Customs and Border Protection to release a full account of what happened in this investigation so that this kind of inappropriate conduct does not happen again. “

Watkins said she too was “deeply troubled by the length of the CBP and DHS staff apparently trying to identify journalistic sources and dig into my personal life.” It was freezing then, and it’s still freezing now.

This content appears as provided to The Globe by the original broadcast service. It was not edited by Globe staff.

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Apple Daily, a closed Hong Kong pro-democracy newspaper, and founder Jimmy Lai win press freedom award https://thebackwaterspress.org/apple-daily-a-closed-hong-kong-pro-democracy-newspaper-and-founder-jimmy-lai-win-press-freedom-award/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/apple-daily-a-closed-hong-kong-pro-democracy-newspaper-and-founder-jimmy-lai-win-press-freedom-award/ [ad_1] Jailed Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai and staff at his now-closed Apple Daily have received a prestigious press freedom award from the World Association of News Editors. Apple Daily, formerly Hong Kong’s most popular pro-democracy newspaper, collapsed in June after authorities froze its assets under a national security law imposed by Beijing to […]]]>


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Jailed Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai and staff at his now-closed Apple Daily have received a prestigious press freedom award from the World Association of News Editors.

Apple Daily, formerly Hong Kong’s most popular pro-democracy newspaper, collapsed in June after authorities froze its assets under a national security law imposed by Beijing to curb dissent.

Jimmy Lai. File photo: Kelly Ho / HKFP.

Lai, the newspaper’s outspoken founder, and several senior executives and editors were arrested for “foreign collusion” over Apple Daily’s support for international sanctions against China.

Warren Fernandez, president of the World Editors Forum, said this year’s Golden Pen of Freedom award underscored the “fears and challenges” of journalists facing growing restrictions in Hong Kong, a regional media hub.

“The imprisonment of a publisher, the arrest of an editor and his senior colleagues, the closing of a newsroom and the shutting down of a media headline – the 2021 Golden Pen Award recognizes and reflects on all these elements. “Fernandez said in a virtual ceremony Wednesday.

Apple Daily was known for its harsh criticism of Chinese leaders, and Beijing has made no secret of its desire to see the tabloid silenced.

Sebastien Lai, receiving the award on his father’s behalf, said there would be “fewer and fewer people shining a light on these dark corners” given the shutdown of Apple Daily and the ongoing crackdown on journalism In the region.

In a statement announcing the award, the World Association of News Editors called Lai “a vocal critic of Beijing’s control over Hong Kong and a leading supporter of the pro-democracy movement.”

Established in 1961, the Golden Pen of Freedom is an annual award that recognizes outstanding contributions to the defense and promotion of press freedom.

In authoritarian China, all local media are censored and state-controlled, while foreign media face significant barriers to reporting and visa denials.

Hong Kong has long served as a regional media hub, though it has fallen in press freedom rankings in recent years as Beijing asserts greater control over the city.

The crackdown on local media has intensified following huge and often violent protests for democracy two years ago and the subsequent imposition of the security law.

An Apple Daily supporter holds a copy of its final edition in front of the newspaper’s headquarters in Tseung Kwan O on June 24, 2021, before the newspaper was forced to shut down following accusations it violated the law on national security. Archive photo: Studio Incendo.

International media maintains a strong presence in the city with organizations such as the Financial Times, AFP, CNN, The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg having their regional headquarters in Hong Kong.

But the security law and crackdown on dissent shook nerves.

Last month, an Australian correspondent for The Economist was denied a visa – the fourth foreign journalist to be denied a visa without explanation since 2018.

The New York Times moved its Asian information center to South Korea last year, citing both security law and multiple visa delays.

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As Project Veritas claims its press freedom violated, right-wing video producer attacks rights of real journalists https://thebackwaterspress.org/as-project-veritas-claims-its-press-freedom-violated-right-wing-video-producer-attacks-rights-of-real-journalists/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 20:18:23 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/as-project-veritas-claims-its-press-freedom-violated-right-wing-video-producer-attacks-rights-of-real-journalists/ [ad_1] Far-right video producer Project Veritas has been trying to undermine the careers and rights of mainstream journalists for years, but following the FBI raids on the home of founder and CEO James O’Keefe and his associates, the group now claims that its own journalistic rights have been violated. Project Veritas is widely known for […]]]>


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Far-right video producer Project Veritas has been trying to undermine the careers and rights of mainstream journalists for years, but following the FBI raids on the home of founder and CEO James O’Keefe and his associates, the group now claims that its own journalistic rights have been violated.

Project Veritas is widely known for targeting and attempting to infiltrate political campaigns, nonprofit organizations, and the mainstream media and for releasing selectively edited video and audio recordings of these organizations for the purpose of showcasing its target as biased or criminal. Over the past year, the far-right con artist has produced and disseminated disinformation about voter fraud and the coronavirus vaccine.

In early November, the FBI raided the homes of O’Keefe and some of his associates as part of an investigation into the missing diary of Ashley Biden, the daughter of President Joe Biden. The newspaper disappeared last year and excerpts were published online shortly before the 2020 election. While acknowledging that his group had access to the newspaper, O’Keefe claimed “that he and his colleagues had acted in as ethical journalists, had turned over the paper to law enforcement authorities last year and sought to return it to a lawyer. for Ms. Biden, ”according to the New York Times, before handwritten pages were posted on another right-wing website just before Election Day.

Since the raids were publicly reported in The New York Times, Project Veritas has claimed that its First Amendment rights have been violated. O’Keefe alleged that his “journalists’ notes” and his source information had been confiscated and suggested that as a journalist this information is protected by the First Amendment.

Project Veritas has spent years demolishing the media, attempting to undermine vital press freedoms in multiple lawsuits against mainstream media. And Project Veritas itself does not function as a news organization. He engages in unethical undercover operations where his agents assume false identities in order to infiltrate Democratic campaigns, liberal organizations, the media and other enemies of the right. He allegedly asked for contributions from donors on the articles ‘publication schedule, took his targets’ comments out of context and disseminated dangerous disinformation about the vaccine.

Meanwhile, Project Veritas reveled in coverage of its First Amendment rights from Politico and the Washington Post, as well as statements of reluctant support from the American Civil Liberties Union, Committee to Protect Journalists. and others.

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