human rights – The Backwaters Press http://thebackwaterspress.org/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 06:38:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thebackwaterspress.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-34.png human rights – The Backwaters Press http://thebackwaterspress.org/ 32 32 The Guardian’s view on privacy and freedom of the press law: not finding a balance | Editorial https://thebackwaterspress.org/the-guardians-view-on-privacy-and-freedom-of-the-press-law-not-finding-a-balance-editorial/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/the-guardians-view-on-privacy-and-freedom-of-the-press-law-not-finding-a-balance-editorial/ PEver since Andrew’s decision to cut his losses and settle with Virginia Giuffre has made headlines. But perhaps the most significant legal activity this week took place in London rather than New York, with worrying implications for press freedom. On Wednesday, in a landmark privacy case, the UK Supreme Court ruled that suspects in a […]]]>

PEver since Andrew’s decision to cut his losses and settle with Virginia Giuffre has made headlines. But perhaps the most significant legal activity this week took place in London rather than New York, with worrying implications for press freedom. On Wednesday, in a landmark privacy case, the UK Supreme Court ruled that suspects in a criminal investigation have the right not to be named in the media, before charges are brought against them. On this basis, he dismissed an appeal against a previous High Court ruling by Bloomberg News, which found to have breached the right to privacy of a US business executive by naming him as the subject of a criminal investigation.

In a sense, this was nothing new. The judgment only confirmed a direction of travel that began ten years ago with the Leveson Inquiry. The phone-hacking scandal that led to Leveson has come to symbolize the excesses of intrusive and lewd reporting by the tabloid press in particular. In its wake, the notion of privacy – set out in Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights – has been interpreted in an increasingly broad and generous way by the courts. The right to freedom of expression – and the freedom of the press to report – have therefore been pushed into the background. In 2018, in the most high-profile case of its kind, the High Court ruled that the BBC broke privacy law by identifying Sir Cliff Richard as being investigated over allegations of sexual abuse. He was never arrested or charged.

The potential harm to named suspects who are never charged has always been able to be recognized through a defamation action. But in the way they choose to balance the competing rights of privacy and free speech, these legal judgments reflect new perspectives and priorities in the post-Leveson decade.

Wednesday’s decision is a sign that the pendulum has swung too far toward suppressing information of legitimate public interest. The Bloomberg case concerned a criminal investigation into the business activities of an executive of a large public company with investors, customers and shareholders. As the editor of the news agency pointed out in a writing response, expanding the scope of privacy law to this extent will hamper investigative journalism into corporate wrongdoing. From the Libor banking scandal to the denunciation of accounting fraud at Wirecard, the public value of such reports has been repeatedly demonstrated. Nor is it advisable to throw a cloak of secrecy over police investigations, shielding them from public scrutiny and accountability. Perhaps more importantly, an excessive legal presumption in favor of privacy removes the possibility of publicity leading to new testimony, as members of the public come forward. This is how Harvey Weinstein was brought to Justice after decades of sexual predation.

Bloomberg’s verdict delivered disengage that there may be cases where naming suspects is in the public interest. But this judgment sends an unequivocal message that the threshold of justification will be intimidating, prohibitive. The right to privacy and protection from reputational damage risks becoming a catch-all instrument with which the powerful and wealthy can erect a screen around their entire lives and shut down all scrutiny. A healthy democracy requires that a better balance be struck between freedom of the press and the right to privacy.

]]>
Press release | Press releases | Writing https://thebackwaterspress.org/press-release-press-releases-writing-20/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 21:28:52 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/press-release-press-releases-writing-20/ 15.02.22 WASHINGTON – US Senator Bill Cassidy, MD (R-LA) met with NBA player and China spokesperson Enes Kanter Freedom today to discuss the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) genocide against the ethnic minority population , the Uighurs, and the Beijing Winter Olympics. “Enes is an important voice bringing the genocide to light,” said Dr. Cassidy. “Some […]]]>

15.02.22

WASHINGTON – US Senator Bill Cassidy, MD (R-LA) met with NBA player and China spokesperson Enes Kanter Freedom today to discuss the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) genocide against the ethnic minority population , the Uighurs, and the Beijing Winter Olympics.

Enes is an important voice bringing the genocide to light,” said Dr. Cassidy. “Some NBA athletes and owners are willfully ignoring the CCP’s human rights abuses while courting China for higher profits in the league. We must amplify those risking their livelihoods to speak out against this murderous regime. . »

A native of Turkey, Kanter Freedom criticized the CCP’s business dealings with the NBA, Nike and the International Olympic Committee. Kanter Freedom officially became a US citizen last November.

Fund

Cassidy has been a vocal critic of the CCP and its slavery-based economy, co-sponsoring the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which became law last year.

Last month, Cassidy wrote an op-ed exposing China’s slave economy, arguing the real cost of “Made in China” label is much higher than the simple price.

###



Previous post

]]>
MEDIA ADVISORY: Equality Florida to Call Press Conference to Condemn Censorship and Surveillance State Legislative Agenda | Business https://thebackwaterspress.org/media-advisory-equality-florida-to-call-press-conference-to-condemn-censorship-and-surveillance-state-legislative-agenda-business/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 18:21:44 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/media-advisory-equality-florida-to-call-press-conference-to-condemn-censorship-and-surveillance-state-legislative-agenda-business/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–February 14, 2022– Equality Florida, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, and the Human Rights Campaign will hold a press conference at the Florida Capitol on Tuesday, February 15 at 9:30 a.m. to discuss a list of bills pending in the Florida Legislature, including including the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. The event comes as national outrage […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–February 14, 2022–

Equality Florida, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, and the Human Rights Campaign will hold a press conference at the Florida Capitol on Tuesday, February 15 at 9:30 a.m. to discuss a list of bills pending in the Florida Legislature, including including the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. The event comes as national outrage over the onslaught of extremist legislation grows, prompting a rare statement from President Biden condemning the movements in Florida. Speakers will include representatives from each organization, lawmakers and Floridians directly affected by bigoted bills from across the state.

This press release is multimedia. View the full press release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220214005698/en/

WHAT:

Press conference by Equality Florida, AIDS Healthcare Foundation and Human Rights Campaign

WHEN:

Tuesday, February 15 at 9:30 a.m.

OR:

The Florida Historic Capitol Building, front steps (Apalachee Parkway side)

400 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399

VIRTUAL ACCESS:

https://equalityflorida.zoom.us/j/81587263544

WHO:

Speakers to include:

• State Representative Carlos Guillermo Smith (he/him), HD 49

• State Representative Anna V. Eskamani (she/her), HD 47

• Ebonni Chrispin (her), Legislative Affairs, AIDS Healthcare Foundation

• Ryan Wilson (he/him), Assoc. Regional Campaign Director, Human Rights Campaign

• Jon Harris Maurer (he/him), Director of Public Policy, Equality Florida

• Janiyah Davis-Hines (her), founder and president of the Social Justice Institute: Student Association

• Todd Delmay (he/him), resident and father of Hollywood, FL

• Kaylee Sandell, Leon HS student

Equality Floridais the largest civil rights organization dedicated to ensuring full equality for Florida’s LGBTQ community. Through education, grassroots organizing, coalition building, and lobbying, we are changing Florida so that no one experiences harassment or discrimination based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. www.equalityflorida.org

AIDS Health Foundation (AHF), the world’s largest AIDS service organization, currently provides medical care and/or services to more than 1.6 million clients in 45 countries around the world in the United States, Africa, Latin America/Caribbean, in the Asia/Pacific region and in Europe. Nationally, AHF provides service in 16 states, including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. To learn more about AHF, please visit our website: www.aidshealth.org, find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/aidshealth and follow us on Twitter: @aidshealthcare and Instagram: @aidshealthcare

The human rights campaignis the largest civil rights organization in the United States working for the equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people. HRC envisions a world where LGBTQ+ people are considered full members of society at home, at work and in every community.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220214005698/en/

CONTACT: Brandon Wolf; Florida Equality Press Secretary

971.678.5707;brandon@equalityflorida.orgImara Canada; AHF National Director of Communications and Community Engagement

770.940.6555;imara.canady@aidshealth.orgYunny Seo; human rights campaign

978.333.6019; yunny@precisionstrategies.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA FLORIDA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: LGBTQ+ AIDS PUBLIC POLICY/STATE GOVERNMENT/LOCAL HEALTH PUBLIC POLICY CONSUMER

SOURCE: Florida Equality

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

PUBLISHED: 2/14/2022 1:21 PM / DISK: 2/14/2022 1:21 PM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220214005698/en

Copyright BusinessWire 2022.

]]>
LBank Exchange Lists Crypton (CRP) on February 11, 2022 – Bitcoin News Press Release https://thebackwaterspress.org/lbank-exchange-lists-crypton-crp-on-february-11-2022-bitcoin-news-press-release/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 14:00:30 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/lbank-exchange-lists-crypton-crp-on-february-11-2022-bitcoin-news-press-release/ Press release PRESS RELEASE. INTERNET CITY, DUBAI, February 12, 2022 – LBank Exchange, a global digital asset trading platform, listed Crypton (CRP) on February 11, 2022. For all LBank Exchange users, the CRP/USDT The trading pair officially became available for trading at 8:00 p.m. (UTC+8) on February 11, 2022. The Internet has given people the […]]]>

PRESS RELEASE. INTERNET CITY, DUBAI, February 12, 2022 – LBank Exchange, a global digital asset trading platform, listed Crypton (CRP) on February 11, 2022. For all LBank Exchange users, the CRP/USDT The trading pair officially became available for trading at 8:00 p.m. (UTC+8) on February 11, 2022.

The Internet has given people the power to access the information space filled with huge amounts of data, but human rights with regard to the privacy of communications and freedom of expression must be protected from governments and private companies that constantly monitor people’s activities. and use them for other purposes. To return privacy and freedom to people, Utopia is here to provide an all-in-one kit for secure instant messaging, encrypted email communication, anonymous payments and private web browsing. Its main payment unit Crypton (CRP) will be listed on the LBank Exchange at 8:00 p.m. (UTC+8) on February 11, 2022, to further expand its global reach and help achieve its vision.

Presentation of Utopia

Utopia is a revolutionary ecosystem designed to protect the privacy of interactions and preserve the security and privacy of each participant’s personal data. The network went live on November 18, 2019 and is supported by the people who use it, based on Peer-to-Peer (P2P) technology. With no central server involved in data transmission or storage, it has no single point of failure and is truly decentralized. Each node, including the user’s Utopia client, transmits network data using Curve25519 secure high-speed elliptic curve cryptography. The transmitted data cannot be intercepted by any third party, only the recipient is able to read it.

All personal account data is stored on a Utopia user’s local device in an encrypted file using 256-bit AES encryption. Utopia allows users to bypass online censorship and firewalls, allowing them to freely communicate and interact with whoever they want, whenever they want. Users can privately send instant text and voice messages, transfer files, play games, and create censorship-resistant group chats, channels, and websites, as well as make and accept denominated payments in the Utopia’s fully integrated digital currency, Crypton.

Main features of Utopia

As an all-in-one kit for secure instant messaging, encrypted email communication, anonymous payments and private web browsing, Utopia has the following key features:

l Secure and surveillance-resistant communication – Utopia provides instant encrypted text, voice and email communications.

l Decentralized P2P network – Utopia has no central servers, each user participates in network routing.

l Designed for anonymity – Utopia guarantees user privacy, IP address and user identity cannot be revealed.

l Secure Web Browser – This is an alternative to Tor. Users can surf the Utopia ecosystem using the built-in Idyll browser.

l Integrated Wallet, Crypto Cards and Merchant API – Users can send and receive payments in Utopia’s own Crypton e-currency.

Mining Made Easy – Users can earn Cryptons by running Utopia mining bots online.

l uNS, Utopia Name System – Utopia provides a truly decentralized and uncensored registry, equivalent to classic DNS.

l Secure storage and transmission – Utopia uses 256-bit AES and curve25519 high-speed encryption.

About the CRP token

Crypton (CRP) is a decentralized cryptocurrency and the main payment unit of the Utopia ecosystem. The entire process of mining and purchasing resources from the ecosystem is referred to as Crypton. It has been designed to provide an instant, untraceable and irreversible means of payment, thus the user’s identity is 100% protected.

The purpose of mining is to promote the stability of the ecosystem by increasing the number of routing connections. Utopia rewards users who support the mining ecosystem by issuing new Cryptons. When users run the Utopia bot, they receive their share of the collective reward. In addition to mining, users will receive regular interest on their Crypton balance.

The CRP token will be listed on LBank Exchange at 20:00 (UTC+8) on February 11, 2022, investors interested in Utopia investment can then easily buy and sell its token on LBank Exchange. CRP’s listing on LBank Exchange will undoubtedly help it further expand its business and attract more attention in the market.

Learn more about the CRP token:

Official site: https://u.is/

Blockchain Browser: https://explorer.utopiaecosystem.com

Announcement of listing on LBank Exchange: https://support.lbank.site/hc/en-gb/articles/4417323802137-CRP-Crypton-will-be-listed-on-LBank

About LBank Exchange

LBank Exchange, founded in 2015, is an innovative global trading platform for various crypto assets. LBank Exchange offers its users secure crypto trading, specialized financial derivatives and professional asset management services. It has become one of the most popular and trusted crypto trading platforms with over 6.4 million users in over 210 regions around the world.

Start trading now: lbank.info

Community and social media:

I Telegram

I Twitter

I Facebook

I LinkedIn

Contact details:

LBK Blockchain Co. Limited

LBank Scholarship

media@lbank.info


This is a press release. Readers should exercise due diligence before taking any action related to the promoted company or any of its affiliates or services. Bitcoin.com is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in the press release.

Bitcoin.com Media

Bitcoin.com is the premier source for all things crypto. Contact ads@bitcoin.com to discuss press releases, sponsored posts, podcasts, and other options.

Image credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

]]>
40 press freedom and human rights organizations write to LG Delhi demanding release of Kashmiri journalist https://thebackwaterspress.org/40-press-freedom-and-human-rights-organizations-write-to-lg-delhi-demanding-release-of-kashmiri-journalist/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 12:34:30 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/40-press-freedom-and-human-rights-organizations-write-to-lg-delhi-demanding-release-of-kashmiri-journalist/ New Delhi: At least 40 press freedom organizations, human rights organizations and publications wrote to Jammu and Kashmir Lt. Governor Manoj Sinha on Saturday urging him to intervene to free the journalist Kashmiri Fahad Shah. Shah had been arrested on February 4 for allegedly “glorifying terrorist activities and “inciting the public”, with Kashmir police adding […]]]>

New Delhi: At least 40 press freedom organizations, human rights organizations and publications wrote to Jammu and Kashmir Lt. Governor Manoj Sinha on Saturday urging him to intervene to free the journalist Kashmiri Fahad Shah.

Shah had been arrested on February 4 for allegedly “glorifying terrorist activities and “inciting the public”, with Kashmir police adding that the journalist had been named in two previous cases.

The joint letter comes less than a week after the Indian Publishers Guild condemned the Kashmir police for arresting Shah and lamented that “the space for media freedom has gradually eroded in Kashmir”.

“[Fahad Shah’s] reporting on events in Jammu and Kashmir is a public service, not a crime, and should be protected by Indian law,” the letter reads, referring to Shah as “a journalist of high integrity.”

The letter also urged Lieutenant Governor Sinha to release other Kashmir journalists who had been detained”under anti-terrorism or preventive detention laws”like Sajad Gul, Aasif Sultan and Manan Gul.

Read the full letter here:

Dear Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha,

We, the undersigned #XX press freedom organisations, human rights organizations and publications are writing to request your urgent intervention to secure the immediate release of Fahad Shah, editor of the online news portal The Walla of Kashmirprison, and the withdrawal of all police investigations opened into his work as a journalist.

On February 4, the authorities stopped Shah at Pulwama police station, where he had been summoned earlier in the day for questioning. The First Information Report indicates that Shah is being investigated for alleged sedition and for making statements causing public disorder and unlawful activity under the Anti-Terrorism Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act. Prior to his arrest, the police had interrogates Shah regarding The Walla of Kashmircoverage of a shootout between government forces and militants.

Shah is well known to many in South Asia and around the world as a journalist of high integrity. His writing for The nation the magazine was recognized at the 2021 Human Rights Press Awards. His reporting on events in Jammu and Kashmir is a public service, not a crime, and should be protected by Indian law.

We also urge you to arrange for the immediate release of the other detained Kashmiri journalists – Sajad Gul, Asif Sultanand Manan Gular Dar – who, like Shah, have been imprisoned under anti-terrorism laws or pre-trial detention in apparent retaliation for their work.

Since the abrogation of political autonomy in Jammu and Kashmir in August 2019, freedom and press rights groups have documented numerous incidents of detentions and threats to journalists in the region. In view of this, the release of Fahad Shah and other arbitrarily detained journalists is a crucial step to prevent further criminalization of the profession in Jammu and Kashmir.

We urge you to ensure that the authorities drop their retaliatory investigations against the four journalists, drop all unwarranted charges against them, and allow members of the Kashmiri press to work freely without facing detention, harassment and other forms of government retaliation.

Sign:

Ambedkar International Center

Banglar Manabadhikar Suraksha Channel

Boston South Asian Coalition (BSAC)

Committee Against Attacks on Journalists (CAAJ)

Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ)

People’s Coalition COVID-19

Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma

Digipub News India Foundation

Freedom of Expression Collective

Unlimited free press

Forum Against Women’s Oppression, Mumbai

The London Story Foundation

Global South against xenophobia

Hindus for Human Rights

Human Rights Network

Human Rights Watch

The Humanism Project

Indo-American Muslim Council

Indian Federation of Working Journalists (IFWJ)

Indian Journalists Union (IJU)

Insider, Inc.

International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH)

International Federation of Journalists (IFJ)

International Press Institute

International Solidarity for Academic Freedom in India (InSAF India)

Kashmiri Journalists Federation (JFK)

Justice for All, Canada

Justice for All, USA

The nation

Network of Women in Media, India (NWMI)

Overseas Press Club of America

PEN America

People Against Apartheid and Fascism (PAAF)

Program Against Torture and Impunity in Detention (PACTI)

India Press Club

Reporters Without Borders (RSF)

Sikh Human Rights Group

South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT)

South Asia Solidarity Group

Turbine bag


Read also : Editors Guild denounces arrest of Fahad Shah, says media freedom has been ‘gradually eroded’ in Kashmir


]]>
Joint press release – EU-Sri Lanka Joint Commission – Adaderana Biz https://thebackwaterspress.org/joint-press-release-eu-sri-lanka-joint-commission-adaderana-biz/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/joint-press-release-eu-sri-lanka-joint-commission-adaderana-biz/ The European Union (EU) and the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka held their 24th meeting of the Joint Commission on 8 February 2022 in Brussels. The meeting, which was held in a friendly and open atmosphere, reviewed bilateral relations and resulted in an exchange of views and updates on a wide range of topics […]]]>

The European Union (EU) and the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka held their 24th meeting of the Joint Commission on 8 February 2022 in Brussels. The meeting, which was held in a friendly and open atmosphere, reviewed bilateral relations and resulted in an exchange of views and updates on a wide range of topics of bilateral interest – ranging from governance, reconciliation and human rights, trade, development cooperation, climate change and environment, sectoral cooperation, security and the fight against terrorism, and cooperation in multilateral forums.

Regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the EU commended Sri Lanka for the effectiveness of its vaccination strategy. Highlighting the need to address vulnerabilities and inequalities exacerbated by the pandemic, the EU underlined its commitment to making the COVID-19 vaccine accessible to low- and middle-income countries in a fair and equitable manner. Sri Lanka appreciated the EU’s continued contribution to global vaccine equity.

The meeting provided an opportunity to take stock of developments, relevant actions and legislative initiatives in the EU and in Sri Lanka. The discussion focused on democracy, governance, rule of law, human rights, including minority rights, women’s, children’s and labor rights, and freedom of expression and ‘association.

Sri Lanka informed of progress made in reconciliation and in independent institutions, including the Office for Missing Persons (OMP), the Office of Reparations (OR), the Office for National Unity and Reconciliation (ONUR) and the Commission Human Rights Council of Sri Lanka (HRCSL). The EU strongly encouraged Sri Lanka to continue its cooperation and engagement with the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms. In this context, the EU underlined the importance of the independence and effective functioning of independent institutions. The EU and Sri Lanka agreed on the importance of empowering civil society and giving it the space to function in all its diversity. The EU reiterated its continued commitment to support Sri Lanka in justice reform and reconciliation.

Sri Lanka reiterated its objective to achieve measurable, tangible and verifiable results on the ground in fulfilling its commitments. In this context, the EU welcomed the presentation by the Sri Lankan government of amendments to the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA). However, the EU noted that important elements had not been included in the draft amendment law published in the Official Gazette. Sri Lanka noted the views expressed by the EU on the need to take further steps to bring the PTA fully in line with international standards. In the meantime, while taking note of the administrative measures taken in the form of directives issued by the Inspector General of Police, the EU urged Sri Lanka to continue to reduce the use of the PTA and to take further measures practices and administrative procedures for releasing on bail persons detained under the PTA without charge.

The Joint Committee took stock of the conclusions of the Trade and Economic Cooperation Working Group held virtually on 26 January 2022. The EU and Sri Lanka noted the importance of bilateral trade relations. In this regard, the EU urged Sri Lanka to immediately lift import restrictions preventing many European products from entering its market. Sri Lanka said it had imposed temporary import restrictions on non-essential items, strictly as an interim measure, due to a shortage of foreign exchange resulting from the impact of the global pandemic. Sri Lanka noted that these measures were subject to continuous and progressive review. Sri Lanka appreciated the valuable contribution of the GSP+ scheme to the country’s sustainable development. The EU recognized the constructive engagement of Sri Lankan stakeholders during the GSP+ monitoring mission in September 2021. Both parties reviewed Sri Lanka’s compliance with 27 international conventions relating to human rights, labor rights, environmental protection and good governance covered by the GSP+ Scheme. Sri Lanka reiterated its commitment to the effective implementation of the 27 conventions and noted its adherence to the principle of non-discrimination and the removal of all other obstacles to the exercise of labor rights and fundamental freedoms. The EU invited Sri Lanka to provide further updates on progress made.

The Joint Committee also discussed the conclusions of the working group on development cooperation, which met on 2 February 2022. The working group reviewed all aspects of EU-Sri Lanka development cooperation and discussed the priorities of the EU’s Multiannual Indicative Program (MIP) for 2021-2027. They also discussed the interventions adopted in 2021, including the COVID-19 response package. The EU noted that the MIP, which emphasizes green recovery and inclusive and peaceful society, supports Sri Lanka’s development priorities and is aligned with the external dimensions of the European Green Deal and the Cooperation Strategy. of the EU in the Indo-Pacific region. Appreciating EU development cooperation, Sri Lanka reaffirmed the need for it to complement its national and development priorities. The EU and Sri Lanka expressed their commitment to work together on common priorities under the MIP.

The EU and Sri Lanka agreed on the importance of continued cooperation to deter and eliminate IUU fishing practices and honor partnership commitments.

Issues related to migration and readmission were also addressed.

The EU and Sri Lanka discussed ways to deepen cooperation in higher education and research and technical cooperation under the Erasmus+ programme, the Marie-Sklodowska-Curie program and the Horizon Europe framework programme.

The EU welcomed Sri Lanka’s update on its Nationally Determined Contributions under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the country’s commitment to ambitious targets . The EU looked forward to working closely with Sri Lanka, bilaterally and in multilateral fora, on climate action and environmental protection. The two sides exchanged views on priorities ahead of the 27th UN Climate Change Conference (COP27).

The EU and Sri Lanka reviewed ongoing cooperation in the field of security and counter-terrorism. Sri Lanka appreciated that the EU continues to list the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) as a terrorist organization. Both parties stressed the importance of respecting international norms and standards in the fight against terrorism. They reiterated their willingness to further strengthen cooperation in the field of maritime domain awareness.

The EU and Sri Lanka underlined their willingness to continue their joint efforts in promoting a rules-based international order and effective multilateralism. They also discussed regional developments and cooperation in the Indian Ocean. The EU presented Global Gateway, the new EU plan for major investments in infrastructure development around the world, which was launched on December 1, 2021. The initiative was welcomed by Sri Lanka.

The EU and Sri Lanka agreed to convene the next meeting of the Joint Committee in Colombo in 2023. They also discussed the schedule of the next meetings of the working group under the Joint Committee.

The meeting was co-chaired by Ms. Paola Pampaloni, Deputy Director General for Asia and the Pacific at the European External Action Service, and Admiral (Prof.) JayanathColombage, Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sri Lanka.

The Joint Committee, which oversees the 1995 EU-Sri Lanka Cooperation Agreement on Partnership and Development, deals with a wide range of bilateral and multilateral issues of common interest. Its tasks are to ensure the proper functioning and implementation of the Agreement, to set priorities and to make recommendations.

The three working groups created under the Joint Commission reported on their respective meetings: the Working Group on Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights in September 2021; the Working Group on Trade and Economic Cooperation Issues in January 2022; and the Development Cooperation Working Group in February 2022.

]]>
Africa: RSF draws UN attention to press freedom violations in Libya since 2016 https://thebackwaterspress.org/africa-rsf-draws-un-attention-to-press-freedom-violations-in-libya-since-2016/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 09:21:29 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/africa-rsf-draws-un-attention-to-press-freedom-violations-in-libya-since-2016/ After providing the UN Independent Fact Finding Mission on Libya with a detailed report on press freedom violations in Libya, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on UN experts to investigate the situation of great concern to journalists and the media in this North African country. The report provided on January 28 documents press freedom violations […]]]>

After providing the UN Independent Fact Finding Mission on Libya with a detailed report on press freedom violations in Libya, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on UN experts to investigate the situation of great concern to journalists and the media in this North African country.

The report provided on January 28 documents press freedom violations and numerous abuses against journalists in Libya since 2016. Based on information collected from local sources, RSF details threats and attacks against 12 journalists and 11 media in particular, including extrajudicial executions. , arbitrary arrests and acts of intimidation. None of these crimes has been the subject of a judicial investigation, a trial or a conviction, recalls RSF.

Although the Independent Investigative Mission called on the Libyan authorities to ensure the protection of journalists in an October 2021 report, it did not address press freedom violations and did not investigate the abuses against journalists since 2016.

“Journalists and media operating in Libya continue to face a serious situation of insecurity,” said Souhaieb Khayati, director of RSF’s office in Tunis. “The Independent Fact-Finding Mission must thoroughly investigate the numerous press freedom violations and must urge the authorities to end impunity for these violations.”

More than a decade after the Libyan revolution, the climate for journalists is still marked by violence fostered by total impunity – a situation exacerbated by draconian laws and an unstable political and security environment. Press freedom and the safety of journalists must be at the heart of the authorities’ concerns during the political transition following the elections last December.

Tasked by the UN Human Rights Council to investigate human rights violations in Libya since the beginning of 2016 and composed of three international experts – Mohamed Auajjar (Morocco), Tracy Robinson (Jamaica ) and Chaloka Beyani (Zambia and UK) – The Independent Fact-Finding Mission is due to present its next report at the 50th session of the Council in June.

After falling three places overall since 2019, Libya is ranked 165th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2021 World Press Freedom Index, the lowest position it has ever held.

]]>
EU-Sri Lanka Joint Commission: joint press release https://thebackwaterspress.org/eu-sri-lanka-joint-commission-joint-press-release/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 17:52:30 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/eu-sri-lanka-joint-commission-joint-press-release/ The European Union (EU) and the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka held their 24th meeting of the Joint Commission on 8 February 2022 in Brussels. The meeting, which was held in a friendly and open atmosphere, reviewed bilateral relations and resulted in an exchange of views and updates on a wide range of topics […]]]>

The European Union (EU) and the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka held their 24th meeting of the Joint Commission on 8 February 2022 in Brussels. The meeting, which was held in a friendly and open atmosphere, reviewed bilateral relations and resulted in an exchange of views and updates on a wide range of topics of bilateral interest – ranging from governance, reconciliation and human rights, trade, development cooperation, climate change and environment, sectoral cooperation, security and the fight against terrorism, and cooperation in multilateral forums.

Regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the EU commended Sri Lanka for the effectiveness of its vaccine strategy. Highlighting the need to address vulnerabilities and inequalities exacerbated by the pandemic, the EU underlined its commitment to making the COVID-19 vaccine accessible to low- and middle-income countries in a fair and equitable manner. Sri Lanka appreciated the EU’s continued contribution to global vaccine equity.

The meeting provided an opportunity to take stock of developments, relevant actions and legislative initiatives in the EU and in Sri Lanka. The discussion focused on democracy, governance, rule of law, human rights, including minority rights, women’s, children’s and labor rights, and freedom of expression and ‘association.

Sri Lanka informed of progress made in reconciliation and in independent institutions, including the Office for Missing Persons (OMP), the Office of Reparations (OR), the Office for National Unity and Reconciliation (ONUR) and the Commission Human Rights Council of Sri Lanka (HRCSL). The EU strongly encouraged Sri Lanka to continue its cooperation and engagement with the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms. In this context, the EU underlined the importance of the independence and effective functioning of independent institutions. The EU and Sri Lanka agreed on the importance of empowering civil society and giving it the space to function in all its diversity. The EU reiterated its continued commitment to supporting Sri Lanka in justice reform and reconciliation.

Sri Lanka reiterated its objective to achieve measurable, tangible and verifiable results on the ground in fulfilling its commitments. In this context, the EU welcomed the presentation by the Sri Lankan government of amendments to the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA). However, the EU noted that important elements had not been included in the draft amendment law published in the Official Gazette. Sri Lanka noted the views expressed by the EU on the need to take further steps to bring the PTA fully in line with international standards. In the meantime, while taking note of the administrative measures taken in the form of directives issued by the Inspector General of Police, the EU urged Sri Lanka to continue to reduce the use of the PTA and to take further measures practices and administrative procedures for releasing on bail persons detained under the PTA without charge.

The Joint Committee took stock of the conclusions of the Trade and Economic Cooperation Working Group held virtually on 26 January 2022. The EU and Sri Lanka noted the importance of bilateral trade relations. In this regard, the EU urged Sri Lanka to immediately lift import restrictions preventing many European products from entering its market. Sri Lanka said it had imposed temporary import restrictions on non-essential items, strictly as an interim measure, due to a shortage of foreign exchange resulting from the impact of the global pandemic. Sri Lanka noted that these measures were subject to continuous and progressive review. Sri Lanka appreciated the valuable contribution of the GSP+ scheme to the country’s sustainable development. The EU recognized the constructive engagement of Sri Lankan stakeholders during the GSP+ monitoring mission in September 2021. Both parties reviewed Sri Lanka’s compliance with 27 international conventions relating to human rights, labor rights, environmental protection and good governance covered by the GSP+ Scheme. Sri Lanka reiterated its commitment to the effective implementation of the 27 conventions and noted its adherence to the principle of non-discrimination and the removal of all other obstacles to the exercise of labor rights and fundamental freedoms. The EU invited Sri Lanka to provide further updates on progress made.

The Joint Committee also discussed the conclusions of the working group on development cooperation, which met on 2 February 2022. The working group reviewed all aspects of EU-Sri Lanka development cooperation and discussed the priorities of the EU’s Multiannual Indicative Program (MIP) for 2021-2027. They also discussed the interventions adopted in 2021, including the COVID-19 response package. The EU noted that the MIP, which emphasizes green recovery and inclusive and peaceful society, supports Sri Lanka’s development priorities and is aligned with the external dimensions of the European Green Deal and the Cooperation Strategy. of the EU in the Indo-Pacific region. Appreciating EU development cooperation, Sri Lanka reaffirmed the need for it to complement its national and development priorities. The EU and Sri Lanka expressed their commitment to work together on common priorities under the MIP.

The EU and Sri Lanka agreed on the importance of continued cooperation to deter and eliminate IUU fishing practices and honor partnership commitments.

Issues related to migration and readmission were also addressed.

The EU and Sri Lanka discussed ways to deepen cooperation in higher education and research and technical cooperation under the Erasmus+ programme, the Marie-Sklodowska-Curie program and the Horizon Europe framework programme.

The EU welcomed Sri Lanka’s update on its Nationally Determined Contributions under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the country’s commitment to ambitious targets . The EU looked forward to working closely with Sri Lanka, bilaterally and in multilateral fora, on climate action and environmental protection. The two sides exchanged views on priorities ahead of the 27th UN Climate Change Conference (COP27).

The EU and Sri Lanka reviewed ongoing cooperation in the field of security and counter-terrorism. Sri Lanka appreciated that the EU continues to list the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) as a terrorist organization. Both parties stressed the importance of respecting international norms and standards in the fight against terrorism. They reiterated their willingness to further strengthen cooperation in the field of maritime domain awareness.

The EU and Sri Lanka underlined their willingness to continue their joint efforts in promoting a rules-based international order and effective multilateralism. They also discussed regional developments and cooperation in the Indian Ocean. The EU presented Global Gateway, the new EU plan for major investments in infrastructure development around the world, which was launched on December 1, 2021. The initiative was welcomed by Sri Lanka.

The EU and Sri Lanka agreed to convene the next meeting of the Joint Committee in Colombo in 2023. They also discussed the schedule of the next meetings of the working group under the Joint Committee.

The meeting was co-chaired by Ms. Paola Pampaloni, Deputy Director General for Asia and the Pacific at the European External Action Service, and Admiral (Prof.) Jayanath Colombage, Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sri Lanka.

The Joint Committee, which oversees the 1995 EU-Sri Lanka Cooperation Agreement on Partnership and Development, deals with a wide range of bilateral and multilateral issues of mutual interest. Its tasks are to ensure the proper functioning and implementation of the Agreement, to set priorities and to make recommendations.

The three working groups created under the Joint Commission reported on their respective meetings: the Working Group on Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights in September 2021; the Working Group on Trade and Economic Cooperation Issues in January 2022; and the Development Cooperation Working Group in February 2022.

]]>
3 Questions: Women’s Rights and Growing Threats to Press Freedom Around the World | MIT News https://thebackwaterspress.org/3-questions-womens-rights-and-growing-threats-to-press-freedom-around-the-world-mit-news/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 19:55:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/3-questions-womens-rights-and-growing-threats-to-press-freedom-around-the-world-mit-news/ For Ada Petriczko, being born a woman can be a matter of life and death. Originally from Poland, she reports on sexual violence and gender injustice around the world. As a human rights journalist, her mission is to amplify the voices of women who have been systematically silenced by their communities and governments. Their stories […]]]>

For Ada Petriczko, being born a woman can be a matter of life and death. Originally from Poland, she reports on sexual violence and gender injustice around the world. As a human rights journalist, her mission is to amplify the voices of women who have been systematically silenced by their communities and governments. Their stories must be heard, she argues, in order to reshape our societies. This includes reporting from her home country, where democratic stability and women’s rights are increasingly under threat.

Petriczko joined the MIT Center for International Studies (CIS) last fall as its Elizabeth Neuffer Scholar. The scholarship is awarded annually by The International Women’s Media Foundation and provides its recipient with research opportunities at MIT and further training at The Boston Globe and The New York Times.

Recently, she sat down to discuss her guiding principles as a journalist, the challenges facing her profession, and the rewarding experiences of this fellowship. It also weighs on the rise of autocracy in Central and Eastern Europe. On February 3, she will explore this subject and its impact on free media during a IEC Starr Forum Event with experts from Poland, Hungary and Russia.

Q: One of your areas of interest is journalism ethics. What does it mean to you to be an ethical journalist? And what are some of the challenges facing ethical journalism today?

A: I don’t believe in objectivity, but I do believe in fairness. Ethical journalism is about being fair to the facts and to the people you write about. Aidan White, an esteemed journalist who founded the Ethical Journalism Network, told me in an interview that there are about 400 different codes of conduct for journalism around the world, but if you look at them carefully, they all boil down to the same five basic principles: accuracy, independence, impartiality, humanity and responsibility. I try to play by these rules.

I report on sexual violence and other human rights violations within vulnerable communities and have been in situations where people don’t want to share their experiences. I always respect their requests and back down, even though I’ve traveled far for the story. This can be a game changer in today’s extremely fast-paced and demanding news landscape. Ethical journalism requires more time and thought. But I found ways to talk about taboos without violating them. And it’s often even more powerful.

We are facing a moment of transition in the information ecosystem. The rise of social media and outdated media financial models have had a negative impact on ethical journalism. It takes time and money to support in-depth reporting, which is becoming increasingly limited.

The global rise of autocracy, of course, also challenges democratic institutions, including freedom of press and speech. And the Covid-19 pandemic has provided crumbling democracies with the perfect excuse to do just that.

In Poland, for example, we are facing a humanitarian crisis on the Belarusian border where thousands of migrants are seeking refuge from horrific situations. Shortly after the Covid-19 outbreak, the Polish government banned journalists from entering the border region to cover the crisis. This is unprecedented in the history of post-war Europe.

NGO [nongovernmental organizations] and multinational organizations around the world are beginning to see these issues as real threats. Maria Ressawho received the Nobel Peace Prize for Journalism and whom I recently interviewed for The Boston Globe, defends an international fund for journalists. So that gives me an element of hope.

Q: You have teamed up with journalists from other countries for certain projects, in particular Witch hunt. Tell us more about this style of work – called cross-border journalism – and why it’s important.

A: In the cross-border method, journalists work as partners on a story but stay within their respective countries, cultures and ethnicities. This type of reporting allows a reporter to bring a unique perspective and expertise to the story without having to travel hundreds or thousands of miles. The Panama Papers are probably the most famous example of this type of reporting; a global team worked together to expose the corruption of the offshore financial industry.

Cross-border journalism offers a cheaper, more culturally sensitive and environmentally conscious alternative to conventional foreign journalism. That said, the traditional model has many advantages. There are stories in which an outsider’s perspective is simply invaluable. I’ve spent most of my career on assignments in India and South America, and while I enjoy working there, I’ve come to realize over the years that this type of reporting is becoming unsustainable. The climate crisis and other threats I spoke of earlier will make the traditional style of foreign reporting increasingly difficult and rare.

In addition, the cross-border model offers the possibility of hearing journalists who are not part of the mainstream media, generally Anglo-Saxon. We all read the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Atlanticand the boston globe, which are amazing outlets with long traditions and high journalistic standards. But there’s also an inherent bias to the work there. Even though English is today’s lingua franca, a journalist who is not a native speaker has very little chance of being hired as an employee in one of these major media.

Q: What did you work on during your internship?

A: I use the fellowship to delve deeper into topics I have reported on for the past three years. For example, I am taking a course on the history of India, which has helped me better understand the impact that colonialism and partition had on women’s rights and violence in this region. It will provide invaluable context to my most important project – a non-fiction book about the 45 million women that India’s population misses due to widespread sexual selection. As part of my research in Boston, I interviewed Amartya Sen (forthcoming in The Boston Globe), Nobel laureate in economics, who was the first person to calculate that more than 100 million women are missing from the world’s population. In my book, I try to understand the implications of this phenomenon. How do communities deal with such an absence of women? Why does this scarcity breed even more violence against women? What impact does this have on the future of families in these communities?

At MIT, I also explored free speech in my part of the world – the Central European region – where we have seen a rise in autocracy.

AT The Boston Globe, I was a member of the editorial board, which was a remarkable experience. And, in addition to interviewing two Nobel laureates, I’ve written opinion pieces and editorials on abortion rights in texas and the humanitarian crisis in Poland. Now I am preparing my residency at The New York Times.

The greatest value for me is the opportunity to train under the mentorship of the best publishers and scholars in the world. It has boosted my confidence as a journalist and will hopefully make me a valuable voice in public debate in my country, which is at the crossroads between democracy and autocracy. Being in the United States, where democratic institutions are still strong, helped me remember my values.

]]>
In an election year, press freedom declines in Angola Global Voices русский Français https://thebackwaterspress.org/in-an-election-year-press-freedom-declines-in-angola-global-voices-%d1%80%d1%83%d1%81%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b8%d0%b9-francais/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 08:53:00 +0000 https://thebackwaterspress.org/in-an-election-year-press-freedom-declines-in-angola-global-voices-%d1%80%d1%83%d1%81%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b8%d0%b9-francais/ In April 2021, the Angolan government ordered the suspension of TV Record África’s activities in the country, citing irregularities. Image: Giovana Fleck/Global Voices Angola will hold elections in August 2022 which will establish the new Parliament and the President of the Republic. The current head of state, João Lourenço, of the Popular Movement for the […]]]>

In April 2021, the Angolan government ordered the suspension of TV Record África’s activities in the country, citing irregularities. Image: Giovana Fleck/Global Voices

Angola will hold elections in August 2022 which will establish the new Parliament and the President of the Republic. The current head of state, João Lourenço, of the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) party, was elected in 2017. Lourenço was elected after his predecessor, José Eduardo dos Santos, resigned after more than 30 years in power

Founded in 1956, the MPLA has governed Angola since its independence from Portugal in 1975. Since then, it has been the largest party in the country and, therefore, controls various governance and social sectors, including the media.

During the mandate of José Eduardo dos Santos, Angola was considered a country where freedom of expression and of the press was threatensmainly due to the ban on public demonstrations and the arrests of opposition activists and politicians.

One of the iconic cases, covered by Global Voices in 2016, is when 17 activists were arrested after discussing a delivered which was considered a “weapon of war” by the previous government. They were released a few months later.

Voters hoped for change when they elected the current president in 2017. While he looked promising at the start of his term, time shows that his tenure has proven to be more of the same. Under his mandate, citizens still do not have the right to demonstrate and face unjustified arrests and detentions.

Fundamental freedoms in an election year

Angola has seen tension mount since its 2017 elections, which were marred by protests and political strife. In 2021 citizens took to the streets after the approval of an electoral law, even if the main political actors in the country had not reached a consensus.

In addition to the protests, the media (traditionally state-dominated in Angola) has also suffered setback, in particular on television channels and newspapers with the greatest circulation. The most recent incident concerns the suspension private television channels operating in the country.

The first case dates from April 2021, when the Angolan government order the suspension of TV Record Africa’s activities in the country, citing irregularities. Registration is one of the biggest commercial television groups in Brazil. The Ministry of Telecommunications, Information Technologies and Social Communication (MINTTICS) justified the suspension of the Brazilian television subsidiary on the grounds that its executive director is a “non-national” citizen.

On the same opportunity, another media group, which operates broadcast TV channels, called ZAP, was also suspended on suspicion of illegalities in its operations. At the time, the authorities said that the assessment carried out by this ministry revealed that there were newspapers, magazines and radio stations registered in the country, but that they were not operations. effective.

In response, Angela Quintal, Africa Program Coordinator of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), called the government to end the suspension, calling on the executive to stop persecuting government-critical media:

Com aproximação das eleições do próximo ano, o Presidente João Lourenço and sua administração deveriam promote a plurality of perspetivas our ‘media’ and assegurar that o Estado não tem o monopoly da informação crucial para o público tomar decisões fundamentadas.

As elections approach next year, President João Lourenço and his administration should promote a plurality of viewpoints in the media and ensure that the state does not have a monopoly on crucial information for the public can make informed decisions.

In January 2022, it was ultimately announced that the channels would be handed over to state management. It so happens that the Attorney General’s office has decided that the management of the companies ZAP Media SA and Finstar should be entrusted to the ministry that oversees the media in Angola, which must guarantee the reinstatement of the dismissed workers of the channel.

In its recent report on Angola, Human Rights Watch caught the eye to the growing number of violations of fundamental freedoms in Angola, with particular emphasis on the press sector.

O Comité de Protecção dos Jornalistas, CPJ, relatou pelo menos seis outros casos de queixas por difamação criminal contra jornalistas em Angola desde Março de 2021. Milhões de angolanos em todo o país continuam a ter acesso a informação livre, diversa e imparcial, uma vez that Angola continuou a ser o único país da África Austral sem estações de rádio comunitárias.

The Committee to Protect Journalists, CPJ, has reported at least six other cases of criminal defamation complaints against journalists in Angola since March 2021. Millions of Angolans across the country continue to have access to free information, diverse and impartial, because Angola remains the only country in southern Africa without community radios.

]]>